After V-Tech they didn't learn a damned thing

jimpeel

Well-Known Member
The CSU Board of Regents has voted to ban all firearms, even licensed ones, from the campus. It seems they are afraid that a CCW held firearm will go off accidentally and kill someone. They obviously don't have a clue on the chances of being struck by lightning (especially here in CO) are far better than being killed by an AD from a CCW licensed firearm holder.

The students didn't wan the ban but the people who hide safely in their offices, like those at V-Tech, know better.

Read the CSU student government's resolution (PDF).

SOURCE

CSU students, staff split as board moves toward concealed weapons ban
By Monte Whaley
The Denver Post
Posted: 12/05/2009 01:00:00 AM MST
Updated: 12/05/2009 01:49:46 AM MST

Colorado State University's past refusal to go along with a national trend and ban concealed weapons on campus makes sense to students, but not necessarily to adults on campus.

That split is now front and center. The CSU Board of Governors on Friday voted 9-0 to implement a policy that will likely lead to a ban on concealed weapons on the university's campuses.

Student leaders say allowing students with permits to carry weapons means everyone is safer — especially women — despite what other schools have done or what an international study by law enforcement contends.

"I've had many say how it makes women feel safer on campus, knowing they can conceal and carry," said sophomore David Ambrose, a member

of the Associated Students of Colorado State University. "It really empowers the powerless."

In fact, it was the ASCSU student senate that voted overwhelmingly this week to oppose any attempt to ban concealed weapons.

Few faculty members, however, support packing concealed weapons, and many are puzzled by the students' stance.

"This was a total culture shock to me when I heard you could carry weapons," said Robert Duffy, chairman of the CSU political science department, who has taught at CSU for eight years.

Nearly every public college and university bans student possession of concealed weapons on campus through state laws, university regulation or both, according to the American Association of State Colleges and Universities.

State law in Utah allows concealed weapons in that state's nine public colleges and one public technical college. Among individual institutions, CSU has allowed concealed weapons since 2003 and is joined only by Blue Ridge Community College in Weyers Cave, Va., and Michigan State University.

But CSU may be closer to banning concealed weapons. CSU's Board of Governors is leaving the nuts and bolts of a weapons-control policy up to the school's campus presidents. Still, the intent to ban concealed weapons is clear.

"We respect there are many differing opinions on this issue," said board chairman Patrick McConathy, "but members of the CSU system board believe this a reasonable, rational and responsible decision for our system."

For most of the board members, a concealed-weapons policy was needed to head off a potential disaster.

"I bristle at any attempt to limit the Second Amendment," said board member Ed Haselden. "But if a friend came to me after his son or daughter was killed by someone whose concealed weapon accidentally discharged, I don't know what I would tell them."

This year, both CSU-Fort Collins' public safety team and the president's cabinet voted for a concealed-weapons ban.

A final policy probably won't be presented to the board until February. But the resolution passed Friday alludes to the potential danger of allowing students or faculty to carry concealed weapons on campus.

It cites a statement from the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators that says: "There is no credible statistical evidence demonstrating that laws allowing the carrying of concealed firearms reduce crime."

Debate on Friday highlighted schisms between faculty and students at CSU's campuses in Fort Collins and Pueblo.

Should CSU go ahead with a ban, there would be a "public-relations upheaval" and it would lead to severe "political repercussions," said Fort Collins student body president Dan Gearheart.

"If we wanted to ban concealed weapons because they could be dangerous, we might as well ban everything on campus because they could be a potential risk," said CSU history student Brady Allen.

But CSU-Pueblo student body president Steven Titus sees it differently, saying concealed weapons would disrupt learning.

"If I see a girl sitting next to me with a gun in her purse, I'd be wondering if she had ulterior motives," Titus said. "I'd get up and leave and maybe call security on her."

CSU's refusal until now to ban concealed weapons may be simply because it has not come up for discussion, said political science professor John Straayer, who has been at the school for more than 40 years.

He said it's not likely due to the school's cultural history as an agricultural college or the perceived conservatism of the students.

"I wouldn't put much on that old wild West Aggie history angle," Straayer said. "I wouldn't ride that horse too far."

Monte Whaley: 720-929-0907 or [email protected]
 

jimpeel

Well-Known Member
Of course, this is not the only silliness going around at CO universities.

SOURCE

denver and the west
Nerf guns banned on CU-Boulder campus
Kevin Torres, 9News
Posted: 12/04/2009 01:00:00 AM MST
Updated: 12/04/2009 08:13:08 AM MST

BOULDER — If you're caught walking around the University of Colorado at Boulder with a Nerf gun, you could be arrested. Notices have been posted around the campus dorm buildings, warning students that Nerf-gun sightings will be treated like real-gun sightings.

The notices have gone up the same week that Colorado State University's student government voted to oppose a ban on real guns for those with concealed-weapons permits.

Nerf guns began popping up around CU this week, after some students started playing the popular game "Humans vs. Zombies." It's similar to the game of tag.

Read the full story at 9News.com

 

Gonz

molṑn labé
Staff member
I just bought the first gun, at a retail establishment, since the Brady Bill restricted my rights to do so.

It took 32 days, corresponding with the Federal Bureau of Investigation & a set of fingerprints...to prove that I'd done nothing wrong. Ever.

A short, cheap, shotgun caught my attention. I filled oout the permission slip. It was okayed. The purchase happened. As I grabbed my new toy, & turned to leave the counter, the phone rang. It was the FBI, calling to revoke an already permitted (what's wrong with that, to begin with) sale. It seems that something popped up, after they looked through my life history.

Cancelled sale.

I came home & went to work. An appeal was made. I then got a letter stating that someone with my general appearance/information has been sentenced to jail for A-a felony, or B-two or more years with a misdemeanor. I must supply a set of police rolled & verified fingerprints (at a minimul cost mind you) so that the FBI can cross reference with the other 5'10" 200lb white guy (gee, how many of those are there?). If they find my prints match, they'll send more information about it, ending the investigation there. If they do not match, they'll look further into my history for something, anything that may curtail me from fulfilling my God given right to own a firearm. If they find nothing, within 30 days, I can go back & finish my purchase. Gee, how commendable. In the event it takes over 30 days, from initial refusal, I'll have to go through the whole process again.

On the 32nd day, He spoke. "Go forth & buy, you've been a solid citizen & have not committed atrocities against Me". The final letter (wanna bet?) was retured, along with my fingerprint card & a special dispensation, allowing me to return to that exact store & fulfill my God given right to own a firearm. I must surrender this written authorization to the store. Just in case, you know.

While this bullshit is happening, stopping a legal & gauranteed right from coming to fruition, keeping an American citizen from fulfilling and purchasing a vehicle in which he may protect himself & his family, in the vent of emergency, across the nation a hardened & well known violent criminal, sentenced to many years in prison & currently bailed out of the criminal justice system for committing the heinous act of raping a child, assasinated four Seattle area police officers.

What did the Brady bill do to protect Americans?

Go forth & CCW...or openly, if you can.

Ohm by the way, the letter states, almost verbatim that, "it sucks to be you. This might happen with every purchase & there's nothign we can do".
 

2minkey

bootlicker
well i'm sorry you had that experience gonz. sounds like you're the victim of an administrative glitch more than anything else.

i've never had that problem, and i've bought about 5 firearms over-the-counter, all post-brady. the last one i bought was a private party cash transaction. now that was really easy...
 

Gonz

molṑn labé
Staff member
A glitch in the Matrix, yeppers, that's what it was. Unfortunately, the only option I have is to send them a copy of my fingerprints & an application to put me on the VAF (Voluntary Appeal File)...which allows them to keep records of my transactions but let's me slide through the NICS without unwarranted denials.

Great, I can allow Uncle Sam to know all my movements or I can get denied each & every time I want to purchase a weapon.

The Brady bill does what to stop crime?

The biggest pisser about cash transactions is, typically, when what I want comes along, I'm short on cash.
 

Winky

Well-Known Member
2nd amendment Bah!

Minks, aren't private party firearms transactions illegal now?
 

2minkey

bootlicker
in my state it's legal for long guns and pistols. i think most states are fine with private sales on long guns, but pistols are often regulated e.g. in michigan you gotta get a permit to purchase from the local police, and there may be a waiting period between application and issuance of the permit.

when i bought my BHP, the guy just came to my house and i paid cash. i did call the police to have the serial # checked (to make sure it was never reported stolen) before i shipped it off for custom work though.
 

Gotholic

Well-Known Member
It does strike me as rather odd that you have to have a permit to own a gun considering that owning a gun is a right.

All these gun control laws are only baby steps to the target. They are cooking us all like frogs.
 

2minkey

bootlicker
i don't have a problem with having to get a lousy permit to purchase or carry a handgun. big fucking deal.

did anyone notice the assault weapons ban that was allowed to sunset in september of '04? i could go out right now and buy an ak47, a couple dozen magazines, and 2000 rounds of ammunition.

oh, the oppression. :alienhuh:

we're not being cooked like frogs. there's a few minor annoyances. big deal.
 

Gonz

molṑn labé
Staff member
i don't have a problem with having to get a lousy permit to purchase or carry a handgun. big fucking deal.

It is a big fucking deal. Asking your government for permission to possess what you have a right to possess is a simple form of fascism.

The frog analogy is perfect. Taking away your rights in a piecemeal fashion is more comfortable than yanking them away. The entire reasoning behind the 2nd amendment is for your government to be afraid of its citizens.

It's okay though, in a couple of years, you'll need a permit to get caffeine & sugar...it's for your own good & the safety of the children. After all, we can't insure the health of unhealthy peopel now can we?
 

catocom

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't be surprised if in a couple more years,
one will have to have a mark in the hand or forehead,
to buy or sell anything.
 

2minkey

bootlicker
I wouldn't be surprised if in a couple more years,
one will have to have a mark in the hand or forehead,
to buy or sell anything.

all that revelation stuff is a bunch of old pagan stories rehashed to frighten the kiddies. apocalypse is absurd.
 
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